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I’m a big fan of customizing your dotfiles. “Dotfiles” are the funky little files in your *nix-based home directory that allow you to customize your nerdery: change how your prompt looks, set up your $PATH, adjust settings for Ruby’s IRB, completely change everything about Vim, and about a billion and a half other things. They’re fun.

In many ways, this loose framework is one of the most important tools you’ll use as a developer. It dictates how you use every other tool in your software arsenal. And everyone has different tastes, which I find fascinating: sit down at a crafty programmer’s shell for a minute and you’ll find that out pretty quick.

So many lines

But I think it’s a tool that few use, and amongst those, even fewer use . Beginner-level developers tend not to dive into a lot of shell customization aside from a few aliases for Git, perhaps. And of those who do take the time to sit down and really personalize their shell, it’s kind of a mixed bag. Look at dotfiles.org , a nifty little site that’s designed to help share your own dotfiles:

I’ve seen this a lot, and it drives me crazy. The same people who have very core ideas about how code should be refactored, minimized, and organized end up having these outlandish files. They’ve probably started out with a tiny file a few years ago and just kept adding… and adding… and adding to it.

Obviously, messy dotfiles make mental organization difficult for yourself, but you end up missing out on some of the absolute best part of dotfiles: sharing the shit out of them.

Sharing the shit out of them

Think about it: these are the files, aliases, and executables that programmers make to make their lives . If you have a way to easily share your dotfiles amongst other developers, you’re only going to make it easier to pull in someone else’s that will make your own workflow amazing.

A 200-line jumbled becomes a lot harder to share with people. Putting that on GitHub lets others pick and choose from it, but a flat file with the kitchen sink makes it harder to merge in other work from other dotfiles in your network, particularly as both you and your forks grow and personalize your dotfiles. You want to make it easier for people to share code, not harder.

So, organize it

So, organize it. Do what programmers have been doing for years: make a smart system, follow it, and let others use it too.

There’s a lot of great projects doing this:

My dotfiles

Personally, I forked Ryan’s Bates’ dotfiles a few years back and loved it. It’s great to be a part of a larger community- you can sit in GitHub’s Fork Queue, browse what others have added, and within a click or two, add it to your own project.

After awhile, though, I started wanting a clean slate with a much better handle on organization. So, I started from my fork and pushed a new project.

What sets mine apart that I’m kind of in love with is that everything is broken into very specific and distinct areas:

This makes sense, at least to me: too many times I’d be in the Git mindset, trying to add a new alias but never remembering where to find it in the long file I had. Now if I’m adding a new alias for Git I can go straight into , edit and know that all the aliases I’d need for Git is contained within that file. Any new directories created get automatically added to your shell, too. It’s really helpful, and lets you scale your dotfiles a lot easier. More importantly, if I’m browsing a fork’s directories — which are likely to be very different than mine — I can immediately determine the areas of their code I might be interested in.

So, fork it . Or, if not mine, then fork some of the awesome other projects I mentioned. Or come up with your own way of organizing your stuff and share it. Everyone’s got their own way of streamlining their system, and sharing dotfiles helps everyone.

Face it: you’re proud of that 204-line .bashrc, and you should be! You’ve fine-tuned your prompt, carefully planned your aliases, and written some pretty time-saving functions over the years.

It is a total sham

says:
October 2 2017 at 11:32 am

I’m pretty tired of the old chestnut about “the rundown state of British Rail in the 70’s and 80’s before sectorisation and general inefficiency.”, and suggest people take a look at the BBC series on British Rail at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b053pxdr

This, IMO, clearly shows, especially in its last episode, that British Rail had, after all the really heavy lifting under nationalised management, become both pretty good, and more importantly, a ripe target for asset-stripping by the privateers and carpetbaggers who were hovering around in the way wings, waiting their moment.

says:
October 2 2017 at 12:30 pm

We still use BR created HSTs

says:
October 1 2017 at 9:00 pm

[…] Read here […]

says:
October 2 2017 at 12:15 am

“No real inflation at all”. Really? Who does the shopping in Prof. Murphy’s household I wonder? Yes, you are technically correct of course. But that theft of purchasing power is still there. Well, the loss is there in the fiat currency though curiously not in gold which you disparage. I can still by a Big Mac today with the same amount of gold that I bought my first Big Mac circa 1974. So that speculative asset [Gold] that pays no interest appears to have done much better than so-called money. I note that you are in the latter, kept in a bank no less, which you point out is safe. I ask is it really safe? Yeah sure if it all goes TU then you’ll still the same amount out in GBP terms at least. But then again you might look at Cyprus’ attempts at a haircut to bank account holders. The state will do what the state needs to do in desperation to keep a hold on power.

says:
October 2 2017 at 8:40 am

For the record, I do the shopping, all of it.

And my local supermarkets don’t take gold. It’s not an acceptable currency.

If you want to speculate in a near useless commodity, feel free. But to pretend that has anything to do with the real economy is a polite joke, at best.

says:
October 2 2017 at 5:04 pm

I suspected you did all the shopping Richard I stand in awe of how you find the time. Of course one can convert gold to any currency needed, and now with the advent of digital gold (not bitcoin) spending it is easy as well.

My point is, that you have ignored the erosion of purchasing power, whilst saying inflation is low. Are you implying then that everything is okay when clearly it is not? I’d put it to you that holding GBP is the real speculation. Those in occupied Singapore during the war soon found out that paper money wont buy you rice to eat. I hope that you’re right and Venezuela could never happen here.

The most common approach is to offset every other column or row. Columns are named col ( q ). Rows are named row ( r ). You can either offset the odd or the even column/rows, so the horizontal and vertical hexagons each have two variants.

Another way to look at hexagonal grids is to see that there are primary axes, unlike the we have for square grids. There’s an elegant symmetry with these.

Let’s take a cube grid and slice out a diagonal plane at . This is a idea but it helps us make hex grid algorithms simpler. In particular, we can reuse standard operations from cartesian coordinates: adding coordinates, subtracting coordinates, multiplying or dividing by a scalar, and distances.

Notice the three six hex grid directions are halfway between two of the cube axes. We’ll see this in the neighbors section, where moving along one of the six hex grid directions involves changing of the coordinates.

Because we already have algorithms for square and cube grids, using cube coordinates allows us to adapt those algorithms to hex grids. I will be using this system for most of the algorithms on the page. To use the algorithms with another coordinate system, I’ll Sam Edelman Womens Hazel 2 Black 3jfcL
, run the algorithm, and convert back.

Study how the cube coordinates work on the hex grid. Selecting the hexes will highlight the cube coordinates corresponding to the three axes.

The cube coordinates are a reasonable choice for a hex grid coordinate system. The constraint is that x + y + z = 0 so the algorithms must preserve that. The constraint also ensures that there’s a canonical coordinate for each hex.

There are many different valid cube hex coordinate systems. Some of them have constraints other than x + y + z = 0 . I’ve shown only one of the many systems. You can also construct cube coordinates with x-y, y-z, z-x , and that has its own set of interesting properties, which I don’t explore here.

“But Amit!” you say, “I don’t want to store 3 numbers for coordinates. I don’t know how to store a map that way.”

Axial coordinates #

The axial coordinate system, sometimes called “trapezoidal” or “oblique” or “skewed”, is built by taking two of the three coordinates from a cube coordinate system. Since we have a constraint , there’s some redundancy, and we don’t need to store all three coordinates. This diagram is the same as the previous one, except I don’t show :

There are many choices of cube coordinate system, and many choices of axial coordinate system. I’m not going to show all of the combinations in this guide. I’ve chosen for “column” = and as “row” = . This choice is arbitary, as you can rotate and flip the diagrams to make many different assignments of ±x,±y,±z to q,r.

The advantage of this system over offset grids is that the algorithms are cleaner when you can use add, subtract, multiply, and divide on hex coordinates. The disadvantage of this system is that storing a rectangular map is a little weird; see the map storage section for ways to handle that. In my projects, I name the axes , , so that I have the constraint , and then I can calculate when I need the third coordinate for algorithms that work better with cube coordinates.

Although I recommend axial/cube coordinates, if you are sticking to offset coordinates, consider the doubled variant. It makes many of the algorithms easier to implement. Instead of alternation, the doubled coordinates double either the horizontal or vertical step size. It has a constraint ( col + row ) % 2 == 0 . In the horizontal (pointy top hex) layout it increases the column by 2 each hex; in the vertical (flat top hex) layout it increases the row by 2 each hex. This allows the in-between values for the hexes that are halfway in between:

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Last updated on May 13, 2017 4 Comments

A WordPress Development Environment Idea for Major Overhauls on Active Websites

If you work with WordPress, you’ve probably needed to redesign a WordPress website at one point or another. Sometimes that can be pretty straightforward.If the website is small without much traffic, you might be able to get away with putting up a temporary splash page while you switch to a new theme and make minor updates.

But in other cases, you might need to do a much more complicated website overhaul. If you’re tasked with major updates to an active website that can’t be taken offline (because that will result in a loss of revenue, orders, or leads), you can’t just start swapping out themes and making other changes willy-nilly. You need a WordPress development environment where you can create the new version of the website separately from the old one that’s currently online. Then, you’ll need to launch that new website, replacing the old one with the new one.

This entire development ideamakes a few assumptions that you’re working within a given scenario:

There are two maindevelopment scenarios that I’ve used. I don’t know how commonplace these are, but I think they’re probably the methods otherWordPress developers would useas well. (But who knows, I’m not the world’s top authority on anything.)

In this case, you’d install WordPress on your computer and develop the new version of the website offline. Later, you would publish it where your website currently lives.

That might look like this:

Let’s say you’ve got an active website at example.com. You could install another copy of WordPress in a subdomain or a subdirectory. Say, at example.com/wp/. Once you do that, you can develop an entirely new site on the same server where your current website lives, and you can later point that version of WordPress to your root directory so it replaces the old website.

That would generally be done like this:

I’ve done this with two huge website re-build projects. I like this method because I can get a new, fully functioning website developed online and then I can just swap it out for the old website. For the rest of this article, I’ll tell you how I did it.

The following is the general process that you could performto achieve Option 2 from above.

Option 2

Don’t take any of this as some kind of WordPress gospel. I am largely a self-taught person, and I figure out what I want to do through research and trial-and-error. This method might not be the best solution for you.

Go through the same process that you would if you were installing WordPress into your root directory.

No need to mess around with the database here. You’ve already moved over everything.

Now, do whatever you want to do in regards to developing your new website.

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